Richard Sheridan Willis on experiencing the work

chorus1The art of the theatre actor is complex and diverse, but the one area that remains constant is the art of repeating the performance for possibly eight times a week over a period of time.

Marcia’s  passionate and knowledgable work was revelational to me. She frees areas of the body, clears away any blockages, releases your true voice and gives the actor a complete connection that goes through the body and deep into the earth.  Her work helps with repeated movements and vocalisation. By proper preparation and warm-up through her exercises, one is given the tools to come into performance with a body and voice that is ready for anything the outside world can throw at it.

The body and voice are free.  One feels centered, released and humming with theatrical power. The character one is playing feeds on that power, bringing onto the stage a theatrical assurance, aligned with a physical and vocal backup. The actor actually has less work to do. The performance never has to be summoned, it is released naturally and with ease.

I believe the actor brings his whole being with him every time he steps onto the stage.  Marcia’s work expands that “being”, bringing it into sharp focus.

Through her passionate and assured guidance, I felt a calm and centered acting power that I have not felt throughout my 50 years in theatre.

I believe that Marcia and her teachings should be part of every theatre training and in every production team. Until that happens, if you’re serious about your acting and want to add an invaluable application to your actor toolbox… or if you’re just curious about a new way of preparing the performer’s body, then I would highly recommend one her workshops or masterclasses to experience it for yourself.

Richard Sheridan Willis

[Photo of Richard as The Chorus in Henry V at The Folger Theatre. Scott Suchman photographer.]